Dr. Retzler's Longevity Blog

Valentines Day not what it used to be? Get your 'Heart On' with GainsWave™ Therapy! February 14 2017, 0 Comments

Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy (ESWT) is a non-invasive therapy which originated in Europe during the early 1990s. Typically used to relieve musculoskeletal issues, shock wave therapy has evolved to have many applications over the years, and recently has been utilized to provide improved erectile function for patients suffering from erectile dysfunction. In contrast to short-term solutions offered by popular mainstream ED medications (like Viagra® and Cialis®), which often create dependency, shock wave therapy for ED provides lasting results.

GAINSWave™ Shock Wave Therapy, one such application, is an advanced treatment which has transformed shock wave therapy to provide ED relief as well as the opportunity to increase sexual performance and provide natural male enhancement. You might be interested in the GAINSWave™ Procedure if you are:

  • A man suffering from erectile dysfunction looking for lasting symptom relief.
  • A man interested in lasting sexual performance improvement.
  • A man interested in natural male enhancement.
To schedule a consultation with a healthcare provider in Portland that offers GAINSWave™ therapy, call (503) 230-7990 or contact HormoneSynergy online.

FirstLine Therapy Metabolic Recovery and Detoxification Programs February 08 2017, 0 Comments

 

Dr. Retzler discusses the importance of a Metabolic Recovery and Detox Program


Current Self Guided Options Include:

Metagenics First Line Therapy Clear Change 10 Day Metabolic Detoxification Program

ON SALE NOW!

Click HERE

Metagenics First Line Therapy Clear Change 28 Day Metabolic Detoxification Program

ON SALE NOW!

Click HERE

 


GAINSWave™ Therapy for treatment of Erectile Dysfunction in Portland Oregon December 31 2016, 0 Comments

What does this dog know about GAINSWave™ Therapy for Enhanced Sexual Performance and treatment of Erectile Dysfunction?

Nothing much.

Only that he's no longer allowed to sleep in the bedroom.

Then again, with those ears... how could he?

 

GAINSWave™ therapy is a scientifically proven technique that can improve sexual performance and restore your confidence, without the use of potentially harmful drugs, or painful surgery. It has proven to be a safe and effective alternative to Viagra and other oral ED treatments. In fact, GAINSWave™ has been shown to be TWICE as effective as Viagra and similar ED drugs, with none of the harmful side effects.

GAINSWave™ uses pulsed-energy waves to improve a man's sexual performance. As a man ages, the blood vessels that supply the blood needed for good erectile function, begin to collapse or break down. The pulsating waves of the GAINSWave™ improve blood flow by opening existing blood vessels and stimulating the growth of new blood vessels. Increased blood flow results in improved sexual performance.

The GAINSWave™ also stimulates the creation of new blood vessels and the rejuvenation of erectile tissue. 80% of men with ED receiving GAINSWave™ therapy ED treatment saw a reversal of their condition and 86% of all men receiving the treatment for ED report positive results and improved sexual performance!

Dr. Kathryn Retzler is now treating men with the GAINSWave™ in her Portland Oregon office at 4640 SW Macadam Ave., Suite 290 Portland, OR.

Call Daniel at 503-230-7990

erectile dysfunction treatment portland


Erectile Dysfunction Treatment Portland - GAINSWave™ Therapy December 24 2016, 0 Comments

GAINSWave™ therapy is a scientifically proven technique that can improve sexual performance and restore your confidence, without the use of potentially harmful drugs, or painful surgery. It has proven to be a safe and effective alternative to Viagra and other oral ED treatments. In fact, GAINSWave™ has been shown to be TWICE as effective as Viagra and similar ED drugs, with none of the harmful side effects.

GAINSWave™ uses pulsed-energy waves to improve a man's sexual performance. As a man ages, the blood vessels that supply the blood needed for good erectile function, begin to collapse or break down. The pulsating waves of the GAINSWave™ improve blood flow by opening existing blood vessels and stimulating the growth of new blood vessels. Increased blood flow results in improved sexual performance.

The GAINSWave™ also stimulates the creation of new blood vessels and the rejuvenation of erectile tissue. 80% of men with ED receiving GAINSWave™ therapy saw a reversal of their condition and 86% of all men receiving the treatment for ED report positive results and improved sexual performance!

Dr. Kathryn Retzler is now treating men with the GAINSWave™ in her Portland Oregon office at 4640 SW Macadam Ave., Suite 290 Portland, OR.

Call Daniel at 503-230-7990


GAINSWave™ for ED Treatment / Erectile Dysfunction and Male Enhancement December 17 2016, 0 Comments

You have no doubt heard about the many “male enhancement” and ED Treatments available today. You may have even tried some of them.

Despite recent headlines about the dubious, and in some cases, dangerous nature of many of these products, advertisements for countless pumps, pills, and powders offering to add inches or stamina to your penis continue.

Do any of them work?

Basically, no. But before we discuss that, let’s take a look at the truth about the average size of a man’s penis. Clinically speaking, a small penis is one that is less than 3 inches. The average penis size is 3 – 5 inches when flaccid, and 5-7 inches when erect. Most men who think they have a small penis, are actually more likely to be average, or even above average.

However, that has not stopped “Male Enhancement” from becoming a multi-billion dollar industry. However, most of these products are dubious at best, and dangerous at worst!

CNN Investigates

A recent CNN investigative report found that many so-called “male enhancement” supplements actually contained prescription ED drugs like Viagra.

That same CNN report stated that in 2012, a supplement called Rock Hard for Men was found to contain both a counterfeit version of the ED medication Cialis in combination with a diabetes drug called glyburide. Years earlier, that same combination of drugs was found in sexual supplements that had been linked to the deaths of dozens of men in China.

This does not mean that all sexual supplements are worthless, or dangerous, but, consumers should approach the use of them with caution. As with any dietary supplements, stick with well-known or name brands that clearly list all of their ingredients. Beware of outrageous claims, and as with most things, follow your instincts. If something sounds too good to be true – you are probably right!

Shockwave Therapy for Male Enhancement – The GAINSWave™

If you want true, medically-proven male enhancement, there are some remarkable, safe and effective treatments available. One such treatment uses pulsed-waves to improve sexual performance.erectile dysfunction treatment - gains wave

Blood vessels in the penis tend to constrict, or close-up overtime.

Dr. Retzler and HormoneSynergy have introduced a new Erectile Dysfunction Treatment male enhancement treatment called the GAINSWave™.

The GAINSWave™ is a drug free and completely non-invasive. It can help men with erectile dysfunction or ED, but it also can help any man who is seeking male enhancement, or an improved sex life!*

The GAINSWave™ uses something technically knowns as “extracorporeal shock wave therapy,” or “ESWT.” ESWT improves blood flow to the penis by unclogging existing blood vessels and encouraging the growth of new blood vessels. Those dual effects result in significantly increased blood flow to the penis, which leads to bigger and longer lasting erections.*

ESWT also triggers the release of unique “growth proteins” in the penis. These growth factors can repair old blood vessels that have decayed or become blocked over time, and also lead to the formation of new blood vessels and the rejuvenation of erectile tissue.*

These healing factors can also “wake up” dormant stem cells in the penis, which can lead to the growth of new tissue, and actually increase penis size! This is especially true when the GAINSWave™ can be combined with other clinically proven male enhancement techniques, like the P-shot. The P-shot uses platelet rich plasma, or PRP to provide medical male enhancement.*

As compared to other erectile dysfunction treatments , this ED Treatment in Portland is non-invasive, has little or no-known side effects, and provides results that can last for up to 2 years or more!*

Call 503-230-7990 and ask to speak with our clinic director Daniel to determine if GAINSWave™ Therapy is your solution for erectile dysfunction and performance issues.

*Please be advised that the statements above and on this informational website have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.


Alcohol. How much is too much? November 18 2015, 0 Comments

When trying to determine if your drinking habits are worrisome, you'll likely wonder: How much is too much?

Millions of people drink alcoholic beverages on a regular basis without ever developing a drinking problem; they do not become alcohol abusers, alcohol dependent, or alcoholics. But how do you know if you are drinking at a safe level? How much alcohol can you drink and still be considered a low-risk drinker?

Research has shown that women develop alcohol problems at lower levels of consumption than men. Therefore, the guidelines for low-risk drinking are lower for females.

Guidelines for women are three or fewer standard drinks a day and no more than seven drinks per week. As for men, both the daily and weekly standards must be met to remain in the low-risk category.
If you drink only two drinks a day, but drink them every day, that is 14 drinks a week -- twice the recommended amount for low-risk consumption.

What about Red Wine?

Red wine is, indeed, an excellent source of antioxidants (so are the grapes it’s made from) as well as resveratrol. Alcohol (in moderation) has been shown to reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke, and may decrease the risk for developing type 2 diabetes.

Unfortunately, many people overindulge without regard for the negative health consequences of alcohol, or the excess, "empty" calories it contains. Moderate alcohol intake is defined as no more than two drinks for men, and one drink for women, per day. Studies have shown that high alcohol intake increases aromatization of androgens to estrogen, and impedes the liver’s ability to clear excess estrogen from the body.

In women, more than one drink per day can increase breast cancer risk. In men, more than two drinks per day boost estrogen levels within the liver and may lead to weight gain in the waist and the development of "man boobs.” Heavy drinking in men—defined as four or more drinks per day, five or more days per week—increases the risk for aggressive forms of prostate cancer.

 

 


You have less than 24 hours to prepare yourself. October 31 2015, 0 Comments


Cracking Me Open - by John Knapp August 20 2015, 0 Comments

Posted with permission:

By John Knapp

My birthday is July 24. I have gloried in the fact that every year since I was aware of such things it had never rained on my birthday. The exception was last year, my 60th birthday. For the first time ever, it was definitely raining. Not drizzle, not misty fog, but real rain. It gave me pause. I do believe in signs and omens. Looking back I had no idea how ill the omen was for the year that lay ahead.

Though I have very good eating and exercise habits, I have had a hard time as I have gotten older sustaining vigorous exercise. I have written before in this blog about going deep into the Raw Vegan wilderness. It was all in an effort to cure a bewildering set of issues, including fatigue that was occasionally severe. I was told it was depression. I was told “adrenal fatigue.” I tried acupuncture, raw vegan resorts and all told me that my heart rate and blood pressure were quite good, as did my regular doctor.

I gave up “the search” sometime in the last year. I was getting too old to chase the dream of finding the cure for these vague ailments. “Just chalk it up to getting older,” I told myself. Yet, I would continue to have incidences of running completely out of gas on quite easy walks. Those bewildering incidences drove me to the offices of Dr. Kathryn Retzler.

John Knapp

John Knapp

I met with Dr. Retzler, who interned for a year with famed heart specialist, Dr. Mark C. Houston. She had an impressive treatment protocol that was unlike any I had been through before. I was given an extensive questionnaire about my health, and my family’s health history. I had blood work done that looked at types of cholesterol I had not heard of, and even included a look at my genes. Given my family’s health problems and my genetic background, I found I was at high risk for many things, particularly Alzheimer’s and heart disease.

Dr. Retzler ordered a heart CT scan so that she could get something called a “calcium score”. I had never heard of it. When and if cholesterol plaque builds up in your coronary arteries, calcium will eventually attach to it. A CT scan cannot see soft tissue or cholesterol plaque, but it can see calcium. Based on the amount of calcium that the scan finds, a score is given for the major arteries on the surface of the heart, the ones that supply the heart itself with oxygen. If you are in your forties, they would like to see a score of “0”. Scores up to 100 put you in varying categories of risk. A score of 400 puts you in the very high risk category.

On April 13th Dr. Retzler called me at work to talk to me about my scan. I had a calcium score of 3,136. I had advanced coronary artery disease, she said. She referred me to Dr. Michael Shapiro at the heart clinic at OHSU Hospital in Portland, Oregon, and asked that I be given the highest priority, and I was scheduled to see him the next week.

The news was disquieting to say the least. My fraternal twin brother, Mark, had died of advanced coronary artery disease at the age of 46. I had assumed I had dodged that bullet. I searched the internet looking up calcium scores, hitting all the blog sites with frantic people wanting to know what their score meant for them. But I found no one with a score anywhere near as high as mine. The highest that I’d seen was one score of 1,000. It was only later that Dr. Retzler told me that Dr. Shapiro, a cardiologist for over 10 years, mentioned that he had never met anyone with a score as high as mine. His visit summary said it all. “Patient has a profoundly high coronary calcium score.”

Dr. Shapiro arranged for me to have a stress EKG test, which showed my heart was having to work too hard to pump blood. Then it was on to a coronary angiogram, which was over quickly. There wasn’t enough room in my arteries to cleanly navigate the little catheter that takes a picture of insides of the arteries.

I was scheduled for a triple bypass 5 days later, on Monday May 11th, four weeks to the day that I received the results of my heart CT Scan. I had three working days to put my affairs in order, file my disability paperwork and arrange for others to take over my work duties during an unknown amount of time off.

During the bypass procedure, your entire sternum is opened, except at the very bottom where they tie it together to ensure your chest doesn’t butterfly. They call it “cracking” your chest. A heart/lung machine pumps your blood and breathes for you while your heart is completely stopped. More than likely they will be lifting your heart completely out of your chest cavity. (In my case, they harvested veins from my right leg and used them to bypass the blockages on three arteries). When they are finished, they use stainless steel wires to stitch your sternum back together, and small plates to reinforce and stabilize the incision. The entire procedure started at about 8am and was over by 1pm.

The procedure is now so commonplace that the surgery is coded as “routine”. It hardly feels routine when it happens to you.

Recovery from the surgery is different for everyone who goes through it. 99% of the people who have the surgery survive, but recovery can be very slow, sometimes up to a year, and some aren’t made better from having the surgery. Most of the post-surgical complaints are problems sleeping, neck and back problems, depression, trouble thinking clearly and fatigue. More serious complications are stroke, grafts closing after the surgery, and problems with the stainless steel wires and plates used to hold the chest together.

If you’re reading this in early August (and I’m not dead), I’m barely three months in and have had most of the minor problems to varying degrees, particularly fatigue and sleep issues. Returning to work has been very hard and I wish now that I had waited longer. It has been difficult keeping up with my previous pace. People have been kind and helpful, but don’t always understand that you can’t instantly bounce back from a surgery like that. Some expected that I would feel better and be more youthful almost immediately. The fact is, I feel worse than when I went in, but the risk of having a heart attack or stroke has been reduced significantly, and that’s something to be thankful for.

By August, my birthday will have come around again, and I will have turned 61. I received the gift of my beating heart. It’s stronger now, and I can feel it lustily pumping the blood in and out. I probably felt it before, but I never gave it a second listen. It will count out the beat for my happy birthday song, and maybe the rain will join in. Whether or not the rain comes again, I will count it a happy birthday, indeed.

John Knapp lives a quiet life in Vancouver, Washington with his rescue cat, Abby. “I’m not sure who taught her how to rescue people,” John says, “but she did an excellent job with me.”


Dr. Kathryn Retzler Speaks at the Oregon Chiropractic Association Convention 2015 May 07 2015, 0 Comments

Dr. Retzler was invited to speak at the 2015 Oregon Chiropractic Association Convention.  Watch the entire presentation below.


Statins. Weighing the Risks and Benefits. February 23 2015, 0 Comments

By Dr. Kathryn Retzler

The drugs of first choice for elevated LDL particles are the HMG CoA reductase inhibitors or "statins." There are three main types of statins: lipophilic [lovastatin (Mevacor) and simvastatin (Zocor)], mildly lipophilic [fluvaststin (Lescol) and atorvastatin (Lipitor)], and hydrophilic (pravastatin (Pravachol) and rosuvastatin (Crestor)].

Statin drugs are very effective for lowering LDL cholesterol levels. They are less effective than niacin and fish oil for reducing triglycerides and changing small dense LDL to large buoyant particles, or niacin for raising HDL cholesterol.

Data is clear that statins can decrease the risk for cardiovascular events in people who are at high risk or who already have had a heart attack. Statin medications can improve nitric oxide synthesis in the endothelium, inhibit LDL oxidation, decrease macrophage uptake of LDL, and reduce monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. In addition, statins can reduce inflammation, lowering hsCRP and pro-inflammatory cytokines. These mechanisms may provide stabilization of plaque. It’s likely that the cardioprotection offered by statins is due to its pleitrophic effects, rather than just LDL lowering.

The JUPITER trial, including nearly 18,000 patients, showed that rosuvastatin (Crestor) is the most effective statin, reducing heart attack and stroke risk by approximately 50%, decreasing blood clots by 43%, and decreasing all cause mortality by 20%. Crestor given at 80 mg once per week may be as effective as 10 mg of Lipitor given daily. In addition, alternate day dosing of statins results in the same LDL reduction as daily dosing (less expensive with fewer side effects).

The most recent evidence regarding the use of statins and prevention of cardiovascular disease from the Cochrane Database reviewed 18 randomized controlled trials where patients without cardiovascular disease were given statins or placebos for a minimum of one year. The conclusion was that statins reduced the risk of stroke, heart attack, and death. There is debate about whether or not statins actually decrease mortality (risk of dying).

It's important to consider how many people need to take statin medications as primary prevention, meaning prevention of heart attack in people without cardiovascular disease or high risk. This is termed the "number needed to treat" or "NNT". The NNT with statins and heart attack prevention is 60. That means, 60 people need to take a statin medication for 5 years to decrease 1 heart attack. The NNT for preventing stroke is 268. To put this in percentage terms, it takes 5 years of daily statin therapy to achieve a 1.6% chance of avoiding a heart attack, and a 0.37% chance of avoiding a stroke in patients who are not high risk.

The harms of statins are less publicized than benefits, but are well documented. A recent review of statin-induced myopathy (muscle inflammation) suggests that 10% is a relatively conservative estimate for this side effect. Statins may also slightly increase this risk for diabetes, especially in women. The most common side effects of statins are gastrointestinal, including constipation and abdominal cramps. These symptoms may be mild to severe and generally subside as therapy continues.

If you are pregnant, have active or chronic liver disease, or are allergic to statins, you should not use any statins. Consuming grapefruit or grapefruit juice inhibits the metabolism of statins, which may increase the risk for myopathy or rhabdomyolisis.

If you've been prescribed a statin, please let me know immediately if you develop any significant malaise, fever, muscle tenderness, or weakness. Replacing CoQ10 (depleted by statin medications) has been shown to improve statin-induced muscle pain and weakness by approximately 50%.

About Dr. Retzler:

Dr. Retzler received her doctorate from the National College of Naturopathic Medicine in Portland, Oregon in 2001. After completing an internship in integrative medicine with Andrew Weil MD, and a residency in McMinnville, OR with Dr. Bruce Dickson, she decided to focus her enthusiasm, talents, and knowledge in building bridges between conventional and alternative medicine.

Dr. Retzler founded HormoneSynergy to help people achieve vibrant health, ideal brain function, and longevity. As a specialist in holistic medicine, she understands the role balanced hormones and neurotransmitters play in all areas of health. She has completed a fellowship in preventive cardiology through the American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine with Mark Houston, MD and attends several age management and brain health seminars and conferences yearly, with gratitude to the mentors who've influenced her work--Rebecca Glaser, MD, Thierry Hertoghe, MD, and Daniel Amen, MD.

Dr. Retzler recommends effective, evidence based natural therapies, lifestyle changes, and bioidentical hormones to address the underlying causes of hormone imbalance and restore health and vitality.